1. I honestly can’t tell you how much i love those tattoos

    holy fuck

    if I was braver I’d get head-vines like that. some ivy and mistletoe too.

    (Source: frostingpeetaswounds, via the-legend-of-josh)

     

  2. thebloggerbloggerfun:

    AU where the writers make Dean explicitly, undeniably bisexual and then he talks about his feelings for Castiel and everyone’s okay with it because it’s that easy holy fuck.

    (via lordwhat)

     

  3. onceuponymous:

    I’m laughing so hard because Artemis is a Greek goddess of, among other things, maidenhood and archery.  She is literally an aro/ace arrow ace.

    (via estelendur)

     

  4. "But it turned out that Joan was really, uncannily good at leading an army. She had skills that no female person who’d spent her life tending house — the thing she was best at, she later told a room full of men, was sewing — had any reason to possess. “She was quite innocent, unless it be in warfare,” says the former roommate. “She rode on horseback and handled the lance like the best of the knights, and the soldiers marveled.” Uh, yeah: I’ll bet they did.

    So it turned out she was good, and you all know this part of the story. She was very good at it, despite the fact that she was initially excluded from the important meetings, and despite the fact that she had no training, and despite the fact that she was a woman and people weren’t supposed to listen to those — “harlot,” was a common theory among the English at the time, because what would a woman be doing in the army unless was sleeping with all of the soldiers; one English soldier straight-up laughed at the idea of “surrendering to a woman” — and despite the fact that her whole authority was based on telling people that she had magic powers. She took an arrow in the neck, in the middle of a battle, and kept fighting. If you want to get a sense of what actually made it possible for her to get from a kitchen in the middle of nowhere, to standing in front of the King and making her case, to a leadership position in the military, to leading this one particular hopeless lost cause of a battle, the Siege of Orleans, and winning it, this is instructive. If you want to get a sense of the sheer willpower driving this woman, think about being just a little female teenager from nowhere with no military training, whose biggest talent was sewing, shoved into chaotic, close-range, hugely violent battle, and about what it would take for you not to freak the fuck out at this point, what it would take to keep fighting with an arrow in your neck."
    — Running Towards The Gunshots: A Few Words About Joan of Arc (via gatheringbones)

    (Source: tigerbeatdown.com, via corelliaorbust)

     
  5. importantbirds:

    smooch the cheek

    Give the kissum a sweatshirt humans.  Can climb all abouts upon!  

    (via hoperidesforeveralone)

     

  6. "

    "My response to the “I am not a feminist” internet phenomenon….

    First of all, it’s clear you don’t know what feminism is. But I’m not going to explain it to you. You can google it. To quote an old friend, “I’m not the feminist babysitter.”

    But here is what I think you should know.

    You’re insulting every woman who was forcibly restrained in a jail cell with a feeding tube down her throat for your right to vote, less than 100 years ago.

    You’re degrading every woman who has accessed a rape crisis center, which wouldn’t exist without the feminist movement.

    You’re undermining every woman who fought to make marital rape a crime (it was legal until 1993).

    You’re spitting on the legacy of every woman who fought for women to be allowed to own property (1848). For the abolition of slavery and the rise of the labor union. For the right to divorce. For women to be allowed to have access to birth control (Comstock laws). For middle and upper class women to be allowed to work outside the home (poor women have always worked outside the home). To make domestic violence a crime in the US (It is very much legal in many parts of the world). To make workplace sexual harassment a crime.

    In short, you know not what you speak of. You reap the rewards of these women’s sacrifices every day of your life. When you grin with your cutsey sign about how you’re not a feminist, you ignorantly spit on the sacred struggle of the past 200 years. You bite the hand that has fed you freedom, safety, and a voice.

    In short, kiss my ass, you ignorant little jerks.”

    "
    — Libby Anne (via newwavenova)

    (Source: dumbledoresarmy-againstbigotry, via estelendur)

     
  7. sblaufuss:

    I nearly choked.

    (Source: spiralingsidewayz, via ash-of-the-loam)

     
  8. (Source: thorinium, via kateordie)

     
  9. tallestsilver:

    cosplay-gamers:

    The Wild Thornberrys

    Marianne Thornberry by Tascha Dearing

    Nigel Thornberry by Joshua Walker

    Photos by Sophie Keen, ZeroKing2010, and So Say We All

    Beautiful

    (via angelophile)

     
  10. medievalpoc:

    The Black Count is Being Adapted for a New Film!

    Tom Reiss’s The Black Count, which details the true story of Général Thomas Alexandre Dumas (father of author Alexandre Dumas), is being adapted into a film directed by Cary Fukunaga (director of HBO’s True Detective).

    No actors have been named so far, although some people are already speculating that Howard Charles may be considered for the lead. He’s known for playing the role of Porthos on the BBC’s Three Musketeers:

    image

    You can read a bit more about this story and hear an interview with the book’s author here at Indiewire.

    You can read an excerpt of The Black Count here.

    (via soemily)

     
  11. ash-of-the-loam:

    ash-of-the-loam:

    patrexes:

    darktheoceans:

    Loki Week: Day Three - Magic

    Seidr;

    An Old Norse term for a type of sorcery practised in Norse society. Seidr practitioners were of both genders, although females are more widely attested, with such sorceresses being variously known as vǫlurseiðkonur, and vísendakona. There were also accounts of male practitioners, known as seidmenn, but in practising magic they brought a social taboo known as ergi onto themselves, and were sometimes persecuted as a result. Within pre-Christian Norse Mythology, seidr was associated with the god Odin, as well as the goddess Freyja, a member of the Vanir who was believed to have taught the practice to the Aesir.

    i get that you’re trying to be concise and all but you’re missing a lot of really cool—and really relevant—stuff, like the fact that the concept of ergi is intimately connected with transgender people1. academia being academia, it gets swept under the rug a lot, but the connection is there. seiðmenn are not inherently argr; although it’s a common enough reference and accusation, avoided most often by being of a high enough status nobody wants to start anything. See: óðinn2. his status is also complicated by the fact that seiðr is not the only type of magic he practices; galdr, which he uses much more often, is considered an almost purely masculine form of magic, along with runic magic. galdr is a form of magic which uses musical incantations. runic magic is pretty self-explanatory.

    Then there are the two more ‘effeminate’ forms of magic: seiðr and spá. seiðr is a very broad category of magic; it encompasses illusions, battle-magic, prophecy, causing physical phenomena such as earthquakes and storms, potion-brewing, healing, and shapeshifting, amongst other things3. it has certain connotations of evil and untruthfulness behind it because of what seiðr-workers can do. spákonur and völur, by comparison, work specifically in the realm of prophecy, or what is called ørlög: the law of how things shall be, as laid down by the norns. the prophecy of a seiðr-worker is not the same sort as that of a spákona; rather than perceiving ørlög directly, the seiðr-worker gains the knowledge of it by using the spell vardlokur, that is, summoning spirits4.

    argr amab seiðr-workers are sometimes called seiðskrattar5. another term is seiðberendr6; sometimes considered a way to refer to any seiðr-worker because berendi literally means “carrier”, however it was used often as a term for the womb7, and has connections to transwomen who used witchcraft to combat their dysphoria8.

    loki is innately connected to the concept of ergi; one of their kennings is rög vættr, another áss ragr—both can be  translated as, roughly, “the queer god”9. they have been a mother several times, and they are said to have given birth to all witches10. (let’s assume that’s metaphorical.)

    despite not often being brought up in mythological discussion as a seiðberendi, their status as such is inarguable. strangely, though, their most obvious use of magic, their shapeshifting, doesn’t appear to be the traditional sort of shapeshifting used by a seið-worker. a shapeshifter in this vein is called an hamhleypa11, and while they take on new forms, their native body lies inert. if you’re familiar with discworld, you’ll recognise granny weatherwax as an hamhleypa, though she’s not named as such. of course, given that loki embodies the liminal, boundary-crossing aspects of seiðr, perhaps that should be expected of them.

    schnurbein; shamanism in the old norse tradition

    2lokasenna, et al. “en þik síða kóðu/sámseyu í,/ok draptu á vétt sem völur;/vitka líki/fórtu verþjóð yfir,/ok hugða ek þat args aðal”

    callaghan; magic beyond the binary: magic and gender in the poetic edda

    eiriks saga rauda, et al.

    5sørensen; norrønt nid: forestillingen om den umandige mand i de islandske sagaer (sidenote: in modern icelandic, skratti now means “demon”. gotta love christianisation.)

    6hyndluljóð, et al. “ero völur allar frá viðolfi/vitkar allir fra vílmeiði/seiðberendr frá svartöfða/iötnar allir frá ymi komnir”

    7 strömbäck; sejd: textstudier i nordisk religionshistoria

    8 fritzner; ordbog over det gamle norske sprog

    ergi as a concept is difficult to define; it’s often said to mean “unmanliness”, but that’s a vast simplification. it comes from proto-indo-european h₃orǵʰ-, meaning “to have sex” (which comes to modern english, incidentally, in the form of “eerie”), defined by seiðberendr both in the past and present as not only gender transgressing behaviour and/or sexual activities but being, essentially, ‘out’, willingly taking on the taboos associated with them.

    10hyndluljóð. “varð loptr kviðugr at kono illri,/ϸaðan es á foldo flagð hvert komit”

    11 simpson; the witch figure

    Eeeeeh I have a bit of a quibble with this, and that is that saying it’s specifically tied to transgenderedness is sort of misleading.

    It’s tied to the accusation of a man being the receptive partner in sex, and at the time doing that willingly was basically counted as ‘you are a man who acts like a woman and wow we think that’s weird and gross.’

    Obviously transfolk are not a new phenomenon, but it’s only VERY recently that gender identity started to be understood as a thing that is separate from sexuality.

    Thus, accusations of ergi etc are more literally equated to being the ancient Norse equivalent of being called a f***ot.

    Either way it’s sensible to associate Loki with genderqueerness and transness and queerness in general (regardless of what various insults mean there is at least one shift in biological sex, and bisexuality is still queerness) and I mean, the association of his magic with a trans identities isn’t inherently wrong, it just involves a lot of extrapolation and attaching ideas to mythology that didn’t exist until recently.

    PS. Who Loki has and hasn’t given birth to/fathered is actually less clear cut than people generally think, so I present to you a brilliant post about Loki’s children by someone who is an actual scholar in these things:

    TADA. Read it, it’s super interesting and informative. Actually just read all of his informative posts if you haven’t already, they are SO GREAT. (And he’s super nice to boot, just sayin’.)

     
  12. appleteeth:

    ihavecake:

    erstwhilegirl:

    fatxslut:

    LITERALLY SCREAMING AND BUYING IT IN PINK

    This would match the bed linens in my guest room…

    I don’t know why this is making me think of katelovesstuff but that is what’s happening

    You could easily make this into curtains and nobody would notice.

     

  13. kawaibae:

    I am a firm believer that rough sex and cuddling go hand in hand.

    (Source: eagerclit, via the-morrigan)

     
  14. lacigreen:

    joponyhere:

    lillianloverly:

    THIS IS A PSA

    THIS APP IS CALLED SAFETREK AND IS ABSOLUTELY INVALUABLE TO ANYONE WALKING ANYWHERE WHERE THEY DONT FEEL SAFE

    YOU ENTER YOUR INFO AND SET A PIN AND THEN WHENEVER YOU DONT FEEL SAFE, YOU HOLD DOWN THE BLUE BUTTON UNTIL YOU DO

    ONCE YOU RELEASE THE BUTTON, YOU HAVE 10 SECONDS TO ENTER YOUR PIN, AND IF YOU DONT THE POLICE WILL BE NOTIFIED OF YOUR LOCATION AND DISTRESS CALL

    I TRULY BELIEVE THIS APP CAN HELP SOMEONE OUT THERE SO PLEASE DOWNLOAD IT

    https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/safetrek/id716262008?mt=8

    signal boost the shit out of this

    THIS IS AMAZING SPREAD THE WORD

    (via nospockdasgay)

     

  15. therealraewest:

    Okay but imagine:

    • Peter Parker going to a fan convention as Spiderman
    • Peter Parker getting compliments on his Spiderman costume
    • Peter Parker entering a Spiderman Costume Contest
    • Peter Parker losing said contest
    • Peter Parker losing the contest to Deadpool

    (via nospockdasgay)